16 easy homemade condiment and sauce recipes – SBS

First, a reminder: the best condiments to have on hand are the ones you regularly use. There’s no point adding to the graveyard at the back of the fridge (we’re looking at you, expensive gourmet barbecue sauce that no one likes but we can’t bring ourselves to throw out due to the aforementioned expense).

Japanese condiments with confidence
Order with confidence at your local Japanese restaurant (and avoid the awkward napkin spit) with this rundown on which flavourful additions are worth taking.

But then, there’s something so alluring about trying all the condiments, don’t you think? One can simply never have enough things to dip, spread, slather or drizzle. Condiments may be the sidekick to the star’s main recipe, but we all know how regularly the sidekick steals the show.
So, make your favourites from this list and try out a few new treats. Just remember to store them front and centre in the fridge or pantry. Things have a way of getting lost when they’re stored at the back…

The great thing about making your own kimchi is that you can adjust the spicy, sour, salty and pungent to suit.
Source: Poh & Co. 2
By all means, start with kimchi. It’s honestly good with everything – try it in your fried rice, your dips, your noodles, your soup, your drinks, your toasties, your life.

This versatile chilli sauce will keep in the fridge for months, ready to set fire to whatever you please.
While we’re on the subject of hot and spicy condiments, make sure you’re keeping a good chilli sauce on hand. This particular one is especially good with chicken.

XO sauce is a collection of the most prized ingredients from around China, and it was named after XO cognac – the height of sophistication in Hong Kong in the ’80s.
Source: Destination Flavour China
The pungent, umami XO sauce deserves to be in every kitchen. It’s an expensive sauce to make (‘XO’ is actually Hong Kong slang for expensive luxury), but, trust us, it’s worth both the expense and the effort.

A breakfast smelling of roses is a glorious way to start the day.
Once you make your own jam, you’ll never go back. Like, this rose petal jam is made entirely with sugar and rose petals… it doesn’t get better than that. Be warned, there’s not enough shelf space in the world for all the jams you’ll want to make.

Banana peel caramel jam

Don’t throw out your banana peel! This jam is so versatile, you can serve it with ice cream or pour it over your favourite pastries, for extra sweetness!

Chia berry jam

An easy fruity spread that can be made in a food processor or on the stove-top. 

Sweet orange jam

By soaking the oranges first in water, you get a thick jam with pieces of rind still intact but soft, and without a hint of bitterness.

Don’t throw out your banana peel! This jam is so versatile, you can serve it with ice cream or pour it over your favourite pastries, for extra sweetness!
An easy fruity spread that can be made in a food processor or on the stove-top. 
By soaking the oranges first in water, you get a thick jam with pieces of rind still intact but soft, and without a hint of bitterness.

A savoury jam is so good on a cold meat board or slathered on a fresh piece of sourdough.
Leave some room for savoury jams like this tomato chilli jam. A dollop of this would lift any veggie, meat or (especially) potato into the stratosphere.

Warm fennel and capsicum jam

This is actually my husband’s recipe, it’s in our last book. We have this quite often, with a really nice piece of pork and some of the jam on the side and a fresh salad.

Wakame jam

Seaweed jam has fast become one of my favourite condiments after discovering it in Kyoto, made with kombu and used in dashi. I make my own version from wild-harvested wakame.

Bacon jam

Bacon jam is a sticky, sweet and salty side you can serve on toasted bread, hamburgers or hotdogs. This recipe adds Sriracha for heat and bourbon for a boozy twist.

This is actually my husband’s recipe, it’s in our last book. We have this quite often, with a really nice piece of pork and some of the jam on the side and a fresh salad.
Seaweed jam has fast become one of my favourite condiments after discovering it in Kyoto, made with kombu and used in dashi. I make my own version from wild-harvested wakame.
Bacon jam is a sticky, sweet and salty side you can serve on toasted bread, hamburgers or hotdogs. This recipe adds Sriracha for heat and bourbon for a boozy twist.

You won’t find fresh tomatoes, apples and onions in that blood-red store-bought sauce.
Source: Alan Benson
While we’re on the subject of tomatoes, it might be time to consider making your own tomato sauce. One lick of this good stuff and you’ll never buy a bottle again.

Don’t stop at basil, use all the odds and sods in your stores to make goodies like this kale stem pesto.
With a jar of this Italian favourite on hand, you’ve basically got dinner ready in the amount of time it takes to cook the pasta. You can also dip your bread in your pesto, dollop it onto baked vegetables, use it instead of butter on your bread or add it to your steak. 

The beauty of homemade mustard is experimenting with different flavours, so make smaller batches of lots!
Tweak your homemade mustard depending on the time of year you’re making it. Cornersmith’s Alex Elliott-Howery suggests using sage in autumn, horseradish or rosemary in winter, and thyme in spring.

Beer-infused mustard

This makes a jar of whole grain mustard but if you blitz it up in a blender, you’ve got yourself a jar of Dijon mustard.

Ross’s stout mustard

I use stout to create a wonderful deep flavour, making a style of mustard ideal for serving in a good pub with sausages.

Ross’s horseradish mustard

This is a Dijon-style mustard with a little more kick, essentially blending the French and German styles.

This makes a jar of whole grain mustard but if you blitz it up in a blender, you’ve got yourself a jar of Dijon mustard.
I use stout to create a wonderful deep flavour, making a style of mustard ideal for serving in a good pub with sausages.
This is a Dijon-style mustard with a little more kick, essentially blending the French and German styles.

Make a plain mayonnaise in moments, then add a spin with siracha, pepperberries, brown butter or garlic.
Source: Getty Images / Manuela Bonci / EyeEm
It’s essential to keep mayo on hand and remarkably easy to whip your own up from scratch. Make just what you need, or a little extra to keep at eye-level in the fridge.

Lemon myrtle adds a punchy, citrusy hit to an Egyptian classic.
Source: Farah Celjo
This particular dukkah is a little left of field – make that an Aussie field as it has a lemon myrtle hit. it’s really that easy to put your own spin on your dukkah mix.

Egyptian peanut dukkah

The origins of dukkah are in Egypt, where peanuts are used widely. It is a staple in many households as a condiment to eat with bread and olive oil.

Dukkah

I add a little sugar to my dukkah, as I think it helps bring out the flavour of all the other spices. It’s a great way to add taste and texture to dishes – like carrots, their tops, honey and smoked yoghurt – and I love it.

Dukkah

Dukkah is an Egyptian dry mix of roasted nuts, seeds and spices finely blended together. Traditionally dukkah is eaten by dipping fresh Egyptian bread first into olive oil and then into the nut mixture, but it also serves as a versatile seasoning in Egyptian cooking.

The origins of dukkah are in Egypt, where peanuts are used widely. It is a staple in many households as a condiment to eat with bread and olive oil.
I add a little sugar to my dukkah, as I think it helps bring out the flavour of all the other spices. It’s a great way to add taste and texture to dishes – like carrots, their tops, honey and smoked yoghurt – and I love it.
Dukkah is an Egyptian dry mix of roasted nuts, seeds and spices finely blended together. Traditionally dukkah is eaten by dipping fresh Egyptian bread first into olive oil and then into the nut mixture, but it also serves as a versatile seasoning in Egyptian cooking.

Pile some freshness into your dishes.
Source: Pati’s Mexican Table
No Mexican meal is complete without a side of salsa. It might be a salsa verde like this one, a tomato salsa or even a mix of both

Don’t discard those carrot tops, there’s a chimichurri calling.
The king/queen of Argentinian and Uruguayan salsas, chimichurri is the herby, vinegary, garlicky sauce made with whatever herbs and greens you have on hand. Trust us, you want this one in your stores.

Clasico argentino chimichurri

Here is a recipe for the traditional Argentinian chimichurri served with empanadas. This tangy combination of fresh herbs, garlic, onion, capsicum, spices, vinegar and oil is perfect to lift the meaty flavour of the empanadas.

Chimichurri

According to oral tradition, the word for this sauce served with grilled meat derives from the English land owners in Argentina who, when enjoying the beautiful barbecue prepared by gauchos (cattle station workers), said “give me the curry” (“givmidecurri”) which ended up as “chimichurri”.

Here is a recipe for the traditional Argentinian chimichurri served with empanadas. This tangy combination of fresh herbs, garlic, onion, capsicum, spices, vinegar and oil is perfect to lift the meaty flavour of the empanadas.
According to oral tradition, the word for this sauce served with grilled meat derives from the English land owners in Argentina who, when enjoying the beautiful barbecue prepared by gauchos (cattle station workers), said “give me the curry” (“givmidecurri”) which ended up as “chimichurri”.

Gochujang is a fermented mix of chilli, glutinous rice flour, soy bean flour, malt flour and seasoning that adds a pungent and savoury flavour.
The Korean power pepper paste is essential to bibimbap and KFC, but also good as a dipping sauce for skewers, smeared over burger buns or dolloped onto ribs.

Tahini sauce is called tarator in Arabic and it’s made with just tahini (toasted ground hulled sesame seeds), lemon and water.
Source: Camellia Aebischer
One of the most useful condiments you’ll keep on hand, tahini sauce is made from just three ingredients. Make it thick for dipping or thinner for drizzling. Either way, you’ll be using plenty of this Middle Eastern staple.

For all those times you don’t have pasta sauce and want to swirl something through, ajvar is the answer.
Source: Tammi Kwok
Relishes of all kinds should grace your stores, starting with the Bosnian favourite ajvar. It’s made with capsicum and eggplant and it’s eaten with every meal, any time of day (well, at least according to Farah Celjo’s household it is).

Beetroot relish

I love a good condiment, I’ve always got stacks in my fridge. You can easily make your own vibrant beetroot relish with this easy recipe. Serve this on a burger, with cheese and crackers, or as part of breakfast, say with eggs and tomato. 

Bloody mary relish

This started life as one of our limited-edition seasonal products that use only British produce, so we had to source a British vodka. It’s a great relish, which, like its namesake, is a real pick-me-up, with a tasty zing and moreish piquancy all of its own.

Tomato relish (kayan chi thi naun pya ye)

This easy relish recipe is bursting with distinct South East Asian flavours – chilli, coriander, garlic and fish sauce.

I love a good condiment, I’ve always got stacks in my fridge. You can easily make your own vibrant beetroot relish with this easy recipe. Serve this on a burger, with cheese and crackers, or as part of breakfast, say with eggs and tomato. 
This started life as one of our limited-edition seasonal products that use only British produce, so we had to source a British vodka. It’s a great relish, which, like its namesake, is a real pick-me-up, with a tasty zing and moreish piquancy all of its own.
This easy relish recipe is bursting with distinct South East Asian flavours – chilli, coriander, garlic and fish sauce.

Chutney is one of those ingredients that just makes everything taste better.
Chunkier than a relish but no less exciting, a good chutney is loved from India (see mango chutney above) to Britain (see here) to the Aussie backyard choko bush.
It’s a classic for a reason and we’re bottling up this breezy beauty for all to devour.

Fresh and vibrant

Homemade goodness

Shiro wot (chickpea sauce)

This traditional Ethiopian chickpea stew is made with chickpea flour cooked in onion, tomatoes and spices until creamy. The texture varies from runny to thick, smooth to chunky, adjusted to preference and region.

Dreggy jar dressings

Instead of rinsing out those last bits from your jars of spreads, you can add some extra ingredients to the jars and shake them up for resourceful dressings, sauces and stocks.

Autumnal jar dressing

Toss through a spinach, radicchio, sliced apple and toasted pecan salad. This also doubles up as a great roast veg dressing that you add 5-10 minutes before your bake finishes.

Analiese Gregory's XO sauce

I typically cook my XO sauce for about 5 hours so it’s a bit of a commitment. Once the water has evaporated and you have a deep red, oil-based sauce, season to your liking with the sugar and seal in clean, sterilised jars.

Umami sauce

Essentially meaning ‘savoury’ in Japanese, umami-rich foods have the power to bring out the taste of other ingredients. Use this sauce as a dip, add a spoonful to soups, blend it in a dressing – consider it your secret flavour weapon.

Bearnaise sauce with crudites

This is a classic French sauce that can go with most meats, fish, and vegetables. Traditionally only the liquid from the reduction is used, but I like to just blend the cooked shallots into the final sauce.

Satay sauce

A classic Indonesian peanut sauce with coconut cream, served here with chopped red onion and cucumber for dipping.

Coriander and mint chutney

This recipe for coriander and mint chutney has to be the number one Indian dip. It goes with almost everything – I even eat chutney sandwiches – and you can serve it with meat, chicken, fish, vegetables or plain naan.

Quince chutney

The ideal accompaniment for a piece of fatty, fried pork, such as bacon or sausages.

Shallot and lemongrass relish (sambal matah)

This Balinese sambal is particularly good with seafood. 

This traditional Ethiopian chickpea stew is made with chickpea flour cooked in onion, tomatoes and spices until creamy. The texture varies from runny to thick, smooth to chunky, adjusted to preference and region.
Instead of rinsing out those last bits from your jars of spreads, you can add some extra ingredients to the jars and shake them up for resourceful dressings, sauces and stocks.
Toss through a spinach, radicchio, sliced apple and toasted pecan salad. This also doubles up as a great roast veg dressing that you add 5-10 minutes before your bake finishes.
I typically cook my XO sauce for about 5 hours so it’s a bit of a commitment. Once the water has evaporated and you have a deep red, oil-based sauce, season to your liking with the sugar and seal in clean, sterilised jars.
Essentially meaning ‘savoury’ in Japanese, umami-rich foods have the power to bring out the taste of other ingredients. Use this sauce as a dip, add a spoonful to soups, blend it in a dressing – consider it your secret flavour weapon.
This is a classic French sauce that can go with most meats, fish, and vegetables. Traditionally only the liquid from the reduction is used, but I like to just blend the cooked shallots into the final sauce.
A classic Indonesian peanut sauce with coconut cream, served here with chopped red onion and cucumber for dipping.
This recipe for coriander and mint chutney has to be the number one Indian dip. It goes with almost everything – I even eat chutney sandwiches – and you can serve it with meat, chicken, fish, vegetables or plain naan.
The ideal accompaniment for a piece of fatty, fried pork, such as bacon or sausages.
This Balinese sambal is particularly good with seafood. 
SBS acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country and their connections and continuous care for the skies, lands and waterways throughout Australia.

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