MADE IN THE PHILIPPINES PRODUCT WEEK – August 17-23, 2023 – National Today

National Today
Submit Now
The Made in the Philippines Product Week is celebrated from August 17 to 23 every year. This week-long government campaign aims to promote Philippine-manufactured products and services for economic nationalism. Not only does it help raise awareness of the Filipino identity, but also fosters public confidence in local manufacturers, inventors, and entrepreneurs in different industries. From small businesses to big corporations, it’s the week to endorse genuine Filipino products to help them achieve not only local but global success as well.
Made in the Philippines Product Week originated from a movement initiated by Manuel L. Quezon, the former President of the Philippines. The motive of this movement was to promote local products, services, and manufacturing. The Made in the Philippines Product Week was first celebrated on August 11, 1936, under Proclamation 76. President Manuel Roxas, on the other hand, expanded the day into a week, which is now observed every year from February 7 to 13. This annual activity immediately gained prominence when Filipinos started to accept local products and patronize small businesses established by native entrepreneurs.
It wasn’t until President Carlos P. Garcia’s reign that Made in Philippines Product Week received a boost as a part of his ‘Filipino First Policy’ introduced on August 28, 1958. It was a pro-Filipino movement that increased local entrepreneurial activities. This movement also served as a response to the economic impact of free trade during American dominance, right after World War II. While critics called this policy ‘anti-inclusive’ or ‘anti-foreign,’ the economic priority of Filipinos by gaining control over their local industries affected their growth significantly. In fact, the 1950s came to be known as the ‘Golden Age of Filipino Manufacturing.’ With an annual G.D.P. rate of 3.6%, the Philippines experienced its highest annual growth rate per capita in the 1950s to 1960s in Southeast Asia. The Philippine economy benefited from the restrictive policy on imported goods and the domestic market.
The Made in the Philippines Product Week was again altered during the reign of the 12th President, Fidel V. Ramos In the 1990s. The week-long event was moved to August 17 to 23 by the Proclamation 1041 series of 1997, and it is the one that is celebrated presently.
Philippine President Quezon announces the first Made in the Philippines Product Week under Proclamation 76.
President Roxas amends the date from August 11 to the whole week of February 7 to 13.
President Garcia introduces a pro-Filipino movement which leads to immediate economic growth in the Philippines.
President Ramos changes the Made in the Philippines Product Week date to its present date under Proclamation 1041 series of 1997.
Some of the most renowned Filipino brands that still exist today include National Bookstore, Alaska, Jollibee, and Goldilocks.
The most popular Philippine products for local and international export include coconut oil, dried mangoes, buko pie, coffee beans, refined petroleum, and pearls.
Jollibee Foods Corporation is a Philippine-based multinational fast-food chain with over 1,500 outlets around the world.
The best way to promote this holiday is to purchase Filipino products for a week. From basic household items to food ingredients, implement a week-long Filipino policy to promote local enterprises.
Patronizing Filipino farmers is also a great way to help the local market. You may cook Filipino meals all week using ingredients you can buy from the local farm. Purchase fruits and vegetables harvested by local farmers to promote the Filipino farming industry.
Bazaars are usually held during the Made in the Philippines Products Week, where Filipino entrepreneurs and local business owners showcase their products. Make sure to visit them at conventions to encourage their businesses.
The Made in the Philippines Product Week Week was established by the National Economic Protectionism Association or N.E.P.A.
In the 1950s, schools and offices were legally mandated to observe the Philippines Products Week.
An influx of imported products coupled with the stateside mentality of the Filipinos has made this week’s popularity dwindle in recent years.
In the 1950s, the Cartimar Market in Pasay became a popular and modern shopping center that promoted Filipino products.
The persistent efforts of the Philippine Textile Research Institute toward The Made in the Philippines Product Week, have led to a rise in yarn production and are now fulfilling the textile needs of academic institutions, the fashion industry, M.S.M.Es, and other consumers around the country.
The local farming industry is greatly affected by economic decline. The Made in the Philippines Product Week enables the Filipinos to patronize their harvests and boost their daily income.
The Made in the Philippines Product Week lifts the confidence of budding Filipino entrepreneurs. It assures them that a market for indigenous products does exist.
Be it dried mangoes, cacao beans, or coconut products, this week-long celebration allows everyone to notice how excellent Filipino products are. Sometimes, it’s just a matter of perception and the realization that a goldmine has been in your yard all along.
Every day is a holiday!
Receive fresh holidays directly to your inbox.
We keep track of fun holidays and special moments on the cultural calendar — giving you exciting activities, deals, local events, brand promotions, and other exciting ways to celebrate.
Holiday survey data is powered by TOP Agency

source

About Merisa

Check Also

10 Best Recipes With Beef Broth – Insanely Good – Insanely Good Recipes

More results… More results… If you’re looking for mouthwatering ways to use up that leftover …

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *